2022 Convention Workshops


Workshop proposals are still being accepted and will be added as they are received and approved. Please check back here for updates on the workshops.

Workshop Schedule:

  • Workshop I: 11:15 – 12:15
  • Workshop II: 12:30 – 1:30

*Some hana noʻeau workshops have seat limits and a registration deadline to ensure supplies are received ahead of the convention.*

 

REGISTER HERE!

 


Hana Noʻeau: Cordage/Braiding

Presenter(s): Nelson Kamilo Lara

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 20 Seats

Description:

Learn traditional braiding techniques using cordage (3, 5, 7 then 4. If time allows 8). Great activity for age groups 8 years and older.

Nelson Kamilo Lara has practiced Nā Mea Hawaiʻi all his life. He is the lead Haʻa chanter for the Pa and an experienced lei maker.

 


Hana Noʻeau: Lauhala Bracelet

Presenter(s): Joe Y.

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 20 Seats

Description:

Come make a simple lauhala bracelet!

picture of a lauhala bracelet


Hana Noʻeau: Lei Wili

Presenter(s): Aunty Gwen

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 20 Seats

Description:

This is a presentation on wili lei poʻo. A head lei made with  twisting  strands around a backing. In this case various colored ti leaves may be worn by all genders. Many call this a haku lei poʻo, but the technique is really lei poʻo ka wili.
Wili Lei Poʻo
A great way to spend a few hours making a gift  for an occasion. Variations will be taught using plumeria, tiare, or other easily found flowers.
If you would like to follow along, here are some supplies that you need:
  • Ti Leaves: about 21 (assorted colors)
    • 9 green ti (starting to yellow is best)
    • 6 red, 6 pink edge or any other color)
    • 18+ inches long from base of leaf to tip, not from the stem.
  • Bowl of water (1 cup)
  • Scissors
  • 9 strands raffia 3 ft. or longer (Ben Franklin or any craft store)
  • Any color Old adult T-shirt that can be cut up or a dried banana bark off a banana tree about 1 inch wide by 25 inches long. Make sure it is strong and won’t break.
Ti leaves

Hana Noʻeau: Lā‘au

Presenter(s): Tuti Kanahele, Nohona Hawaiʻi Coordinator, Windward Community College

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 

Description: Kumu Tuti Kanahele will share about lā‘au lapa‘au and different ways to prepare and use them.

 


Hana Noʻeau: Lomilomi

Presenter(s): Enrick Ortiz, Jr., Licensed Massage Therapist/Lomilomi Practioner/Kumu Lomilomi

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 20 Seats

Description: Refocus and Refresh: Self Care Techniques using Lomi and Reflexology. This workshop will focus on Self Care Techniques to help de-stress and ease pains that someone in education may have. Participants will learn self lomi techniques for their neck, shoulders, arms and hands, as well as Foot Reflexology using a golf ball.

Materials:

 


Hana Noʻeau: Mele of Liliuʻokalani

Presenter(s): Lei Aiu-Taber, Liliʻuokalani Trust Kauaʻi Kīpuka

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit:

Description: This presentation will include moʻolelo of Liliʻuokalaniʻs mele and kanikapila. Bring your musical instruments including your voices for kanikapila.

 


Hana Noʻeau: ʻOhe Kāpala

Presenter(s): Nalu Andrade

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 20 Seats

Description: This is a presentation on ʻOhe Kāpala, the traditional bamboo stamps for printing tapa. Learn about preparing the ʻohe, suggested tools, designs names, and possible meanings.

 


Understanding Aboriginal Hawaiian Agency towards English Language Medium Schooling in the Hawaiian Kingdom

Presenter(s): Larson Ng, Educational Specialist, Hawaiian Education and Leadership Initiative, College of Education, University of Hawaii

Session(s): Workshop II

Limit: 

Description: In order to better understand the educational choices of aboriginal Hawaiians during the Hawaiian Kingdom, the following presentation will present historical facts as well as supporting quantitative data to reaffirm aboriginal Hawaiian education agency and their revealed preferences for English language medium schooling. A brief overview of the legislative acts and monarchical support towards the perpetuation of English language medium schooling for all the children of the Hawaiian Kingdom will be presented first, followed by a quantitative examination that further provides evidence for this position. The presentation will end with an analysis of all the evidence confirming that aboriginal Hawaiian agency in the rise of English language medium schooling was exercised by both the aboriginal Hawaiians in government and aboriginal Hawaiian students, themselves.